Mar 22, 2010

Sugar Hit Safari Part 3: Trianon Cakes, Earlwood.

Today's adventures in sugar take us to Trianon Cakes, 289 Homer Street, Earlwood.  It's a Monday, it's nearly Easter - a good day to be blogging about Easter traditions and baked goods.  I'm also glad to have found a source for some delicious cookies I've been curious about ever since I arrived in Sydney.


Chris and Arthur, the owners of Trianon have Greek Cypriot ancestry.  The bakery was orinigally their father's.  The boys have been in business together for decades.  They warmly welcomed us into their shop, where the preparations for Greek Easter were well under way.  The perfect time for us to drop by.



The Greek Labatha candles - these are given to children at Easter by their parents.  They are only lit once - for the midnight mass.

We were lucky to Visit Trianon in the first day of the egg dying season.  The colour of the day was blue - to match the clear, sunny skies outside.


After being dunked in the huge pots of dying solution, the eggs are fished out in their net bags and rinsed under running water.



Finally, they are glossed up with oil - this is how the yellow eggs turn out.  There are egg bashing contests with the red eggs on Easter Sunday and the last person with an intact egg wins.


The egg dyes available for sale at the front counter.


The red eggs (coloured red to symoblize Christ's blood) are used for the tsoureki bread.  It's the plaited sweet bread studded with red eggs.  The bread can have a lemon and spice (cinnamon, mastic and mahleb) flavour, with sultanas and also a nut topping.  I didn't see any at the shop to take a picture of, unfortunately.

In Chinese tradition, red dyed eggs after given out by the family of a new born child when the baby is one month old.  Ginger is also part of the tradition, for the mother, it is thought to aid healing and recovery after birth.  I am sure more than one new mother has substituted red Lindor balls for the eggs....  I know I would.

Trianon are also famed for the tray desserts - why just buy one piece of baklava?  It's the law of packaging - anything delivered in a foil tray implies home baked goodness and can be eaten without conscience as a substitute for a more conventional dinner.


Pyramid stacked platters of Kourabiedes - buttery almond biscuits coated in icing sugar.  Another 'should've bought' moment.


Chris and Arthur showed us how they make their fetta and spinach filled pastries.  Everything is still done by hand and on the premises.  The pastry is rolled out repeatedly to get the right thickness.  Rounds are then cut.


Rounds of pastry are cut and then filled.




The photo above shows final product after baking, with a ricotta pastry in the background.


My favourite thing was the haloumi bread, left in the photo above.  The bread is quite heavy and the haloumi not too salty.  I bought a whole loaf for $8.  It's one of the best sellers at Trianon and we were lucky they made extra loaves in anticipation of our visit.


The first time I saw these cookies was when I first started working in Sydney.  I'd find massive plates of cookies at the nurses stations of the wards, the scent of butter and baking filling the air.  Aromatherapy for the stomach.  Relatives of patients periodically give them to us as thanks for looking after their mum or dad.  When the plates got light enough to lift high with one hand, I'd desperately peer under the plates, hoping that the address of the bakery would be there.  More often than not, the bakery stickers get removed with the layers of cellophane and ribbon by the lucky first person to receive the platter.



The cookie displays are a huge novelty for this Perth girl.  Prior to moving here, I'd only ever seen them wrapped in glad wrap and somewhat mummified.  The cookies at Trianon look so vital, alive and vivid - even in the photos.


Another little piece of Sydney discovered and tasted.  It was then time to hit the road and take a short walk to lunch.

2 comments:

  1. I'm currently addicted to sugar and instead of giving in....I've been coming to your blog!!

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great post on this cake shop.

    ReplyDelete

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